The Via Francigena to Rome Via Francigena across the Alps

Activity :
Walking or Cycling or Easy Walking or Easy Cycling
Duration :
Up to 9 Nights
Distance :
151 km
Difficulty :
Medium
Tour Type :
Self-Guided
Time To Go :
Summer Only
Price :
From €1015
Reviews :
Claire
Specialist: Claire
Sales Director Claire hails from the lovely Midlands and spent some years living in Galway in the West of Ireland, where she completed a degree in languages. She also lived sev...
More by Claire
Richard, United States - August 2016
"I just completed a 17-day walk from Lausanne, Switzerland, to Vercelli, Italy, using Camino Ways, or technically, their affiliate, Francigena Ways. They delivered a great and rather exclusive itinerary. As I've written here before, the strength of the company is their ability to provide hotels and baggage services for the less traveled Camino routes. And they execute well. First off, the Via Francigena (going from Canterbury, England, to Rome) has far fewer walkers than the Camino de Santiago. You will often go several days without seeing a fellow walker. However, the scenery and historical sites often outshine its better-known competitor. My route from Lausanne, Switzerland, to Vercelli, Italy, is considered second only to the stretch in Tuscany for its beauty (been there, done that). It was a great route overall, but several days in particular were spectacular: 1) the first day walking along Lake Geneva to Vevey; 2) the climb up the St. Bernard Pass in Switzerland and the descent the next day into Italy; 3) the ancient Roman town of Aosta and its surrounding alpine scenery; 4) the castles of Verres and Issogne; and 5) the first day's transition from the Aosta Valley to Piedmont, specifically the walk from Ivrea to Viverone. Highly recommend!"
Activity:
Walking or Cycling or Easy Walking or Easy Cycling
Duration:
Up to 9 Nights
Distance:
151 km
Difficulty:
Medium
Tour Type:
Self-Guided
Time To Go:
Summer Only
Price:
From €1015
Rating:

This section of the Via Francigena pilgrim route to Rome takes pilgrims from Lausanne to Aosta, from Lake Geneva in Switzerland, across the Alps and into Italy.

Some truly spectacular landscapes await on this section of the Camino to Rome, first as you walk by the shore of Lake Geneva, Chateau de Chillon and the UNESCO-listed vineyards of Lavaux; then as you climb up to the Alps and the Great St Bernard’s Pass and finally as you head into Italy and the Aosta Valley.

After Lake Geneva, the Rhone Valley and their relatively easy terrain behind, you will start to steadily climb to Bourg Saint Pierre, but breath-taking Alpine views will be your reward. Pilgrims have been travelling the Via Francigena across the Great St Bernard’s Pass for centuries but bear in mind, due to altitude and weather conditions, this route is only open to walkers in the Summer months. Talk to the FrancigenaWays.com specialists if you need advice.

Click below to create your trip. You can walk or cycle.

Claire
Specialist: Claire
Sales Director Claire hails from the lovely Midlands and spent some years living in Galway in the West of Ireland, where she completed a degree in languages. She also lived sev...
More by Claire